Posts Tagged ‘Blog’

Android Ice Cream Sandwich 4.0.4 has reportedly started rolling out to the Galaxy Nexus and Nexus S devices

Published on Mar 29, 2012

The Android ICE Cream Sandwich update (version 4.0.4) is now rolling out across SIM free Galaxy Nexus and Nexus S devices in Europe.

Google announced the milestone on its own Google+ page.

The exact announcement read:

‘We’ve started rolling out Android 4.0.4, Ice Cream Sandwich, to UMTS/GSM Nexus S, Xoom Wi-Fi, and HSPA+ Galaxy Nexus devices, and we’ll be rolling it out to more devices in the coming weeks. Some of you will be receiving Ice Cream Sandwich for the first time, while others will be receiving an update to your existing Ice Cream Sandwich experience with stability improvements, better camera performance, smoother screen rotation, improved phone number recognition and more.’

Followed by a load of predictable comments asking when it will be released for other devices, including the HTC Desire HD, Xperia-branded devices, Galaxy Note and Galaxy S2 (network-branded devices).

Google declined to comment when all these other updates would be coming, but everyday we’re hearing about more devices benefiting from the update.

If you do have the Galaxy Nexus or Nexus S, it may be a good idea to check whether the update has arrived. For those with network-branded devices, you may have to wait a little longer for your network to properly test the update before rolling it out.

via Android ICS 4.0.4 rolling out to Galaxy Nexus and Nexus S? – News – Know Your Mobile.

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Android devices will surge to slim lead in 2016

Number of ‘smart devices‘ shipped worldwide will DOUBLE in five years to 1.84 billion in 2016

By 2016, devices running Windows will be eclipsed by phones and tablets running Google’s Android, according to a report by analysts IDC.

More than 90 per cent of the world’s PCs still run Windows – but the whole technology landscape is changing around Microsoft’s operating system.

By 2016, Microsoft’s leading market share of 35.9% will slip to 25.1%.

Devices running Google’s Android will climb from 29.4% to 31.1%.

As smartphones grow in relation to PCs, Microsoft's market share will slide so that its once-dominant Windows software will be second-placed after Google's Android

As smartphones grow in relation to PCs, Microsoft’s market share will slide so that its once-dominant Windows software will be second-placed after Google’s Android.

Microsoft is to launch a new ‘tablet friendly’ version of Windows, Windows 8, later this year.

But analyst IDC still predicts a ‘dramatic shift’ towards devices running Android.

IDC expects a relatively dramatic shift between 2011 and 2016, with the once-dominant Windows slipping from a leading 35.9% share in 2011 down to 25.1%,’ the analyst predicts.

The number of Android-based devices running on ARM CPUs, on the other hand, will grow modestly from 29.4% share in 2011 to a market-leading 31.1% share in 2016.

Google ‘to launch’ new GDrive storage service in April to take on rivals such as Dropbox

Meanwhile, iOS-based devices will grow from 14.6% share in 2011 to 17.3% in 2016.

Last year, 916 million smartphones, tablets and PCs were shipped worldwide.

By 2016, that figure will have doubled to 1.84 billion units.

‘Android’s growth is tied directly to lower-priced devices,’ said Tom Mainelli, research director, Mobile Connected Devices. ‘So, while we expect dozens of hardware vendors to own some share in the Android market, many will find profitability difficult to sustain.’

Samsung's mid-sized Galaxy Note device which recently passed 5 million units shipped: In the next four years, Android devices are predicted to pass Microsoft's Windows in terms of units shipped

Samsung’s mid-sized Galaxy Note device which recently passed 5 million units shipped: In the next four years, Android devices are predicted to pass Microsoft’s Windows in terms of units shipped.

‘Whether it’s businesses looking at deploying tablet devices into their environments, or educational institutions working to update their school’s computer labs, smart, connected devices are playing an increasingly important role in nearly every individual’s life,’ said Bob O’Donnell, vice president, Clients and Displays at IDC.

Next year, 1.1 billion ‘smart devices’ – smartphones, PCs and tablets – will ship worldwide.

The numbers are growing at a compound annual growth rate of 15.4%.

Research conducted by IDC suggests that many individuals own and regularly use multiple smart connected devices. ‘We are in the multi-device age,’ continued O’Donnell, ‘and we believe the number of people who use multiple devices will only continue to increase. The trick, moving forward, will be to integrate all these devices into a unified whole through use of personal cloud-type applications and services. That’s the real challenge of what we have often called the ‘PC Plus’ era.’
‘Smartphone growth will be driven by Asia/Pacific countries, especially China, where mobile operators are subsidizing the purchase of 3G smartphones, thus increasing the total addressable market. In many if not all instances, the smartphone will be the primary connection to the Internet,’ said Will Stofega, program director, Mobile Phone Technologies and Trends. ‘In countries where devices are not subsidized by the mobile operators, competitive and component-based pricing will help drive volume.’

Google’s Android will overtake Windows by 2016 | Mail Online.

The ideal crystalline structure of graphene is...

The ideal crystalline structure of graphene is a hexagonal grid. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Imagine a material that is just one atom thick, 300 times stronger than steel, harder than diamond, a fantastic conductor of heat and electricity and super-flexible to boot.This might sound like the stuff of science fiction, but believe it or not, such a material already exists.The name of this supermaterial is graphene and it’s one of the most exciting prospects in science today.In the latest graphene-related research – released last week – researchers from Vanderbilt University found a way to overcome one of graphene’s most problematic flaws – a high sensitivity to external influences which causes graphene-based devices to operate more slowly than they should.The researchers found a way to dampen external influences on the graphene, and could then observe electrons moving through their graphene three times faster than was previously possible.This development could pave the way for a new generation of graphene-based devices including touch screens and solar panels.More on the uses of graphene in a moment, but first: what is graphene?Quite simply, graphene is a new structural form or ‘allotrope’ of carbon – one of the most versatile elements in the universe. It was discovered in 2004 by Russian-born physicists Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, who jointly received the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics for their troubles.Graphene is a single, flat layer of carbon atoms packed tightly into a two-dimensional honeycomb arrangement. The in-plane two-dimensional carbon-carbon bonds in graphene are the strongest bonds known to science. It is these bonds that give graphene its unbelievable mechanical strength and flexibility.Graphene is essentially a single layer of graphite, the material found in pencil ‘lead’. When you draw on paper with a pencil, weakly bound graphene sheets in the graphite spread over your paper like a pack of cards.But because graphene is so thin – the thickness of a single carbon atom – it is extremely difficult to see. This is one of the reasons it took researchers so long to find graphene sheets among thicker stacks of graphite.Despite being so thin, graphene is an excellent conductor of electricity. Electrons flow through graphene with almost zero electrical resistance. This unusual property, and the fact graphene is nearly invisible, makes it an ideal material for the transparent electrodes used in computer displays and solar cells.While scientists have known about graphene since 2004, it was in 2010 that researchers from Samsung and Sungkyunkwan University took a critical step in developing the commercial applications of this material.

Click below to continue reading…

via Harder than diamond, stronger than steel Science Alert.

It’s been a long time in the making, but it’s finally here: CyanogenMod 7.2, the latest version based on Android 2.3(.7), has reached the release candidate stage!

We’ve been delaying it for too long, mostly because new devices kept being submitted to us, and now we feel that at 69 devices, CM7.2 is more than ready for everybody to enjoy 🙂

7.2 adds a couple of backported features and fixes from Android 4 (ICS), over 20 new devices when compared to 7.1, and even some new features to boot (be sure to check out the new predictive contact search in the phone dialer!). We’ve also fixed some bugs along the way. Some of them device-specific, others that affected everybody, and one in particular that’s been plaguing Android for a long time: the mysteriously vanishing SD-card ringtones are no more! You can check the full list of noteworthy changes at the CHANGELOG.

As usual, you can submit bug reports on these builds: if you find anything broken in your device while running CM7.2-RC1, (as downloaded from our mirrors or ROM Manager! Please do not submit reports if your build came from elsewhere), be sure to submit a report through http://code.google.com/p/cyanogenmod/issues/ , so that we can fix it in time for the final 7.2 release.

Also worthy of note: the new release files have a slightly modified naming-scheme, including the codename instead of the commercial/common name in the filename. So the following is a handy “translation chart” to make sure you don’t mis-identify your device:

ace – HTC Desire HD

anzu – SE XperiaArc-LT15i

blade – ZTE Blade

bravoc – HTC Desire CDMA

bravo – HTC Desire

buzz – HTC Wildfire

c660 – LG Optimus Pro

captivatemtd – Samsung Captivate

click – HTC Tattoo

coconut – SE LiveWithWalkman-WT19i

cooper – Samsung GalaxyAce

crespo4g – Google Nexus S 4G

crespo – Google Nexus S

desirec – Droid Eris

droid2 – Motorola DROID2

droid2we – Motorola DROID2 World Edition

e510 – LG Optimus Hub

e730 – LG Optimus Sol

e739 – T-Mobile LG myTouch

encore – Barnes&Noble Nook Color

epicmtd – Samsung Epic

espresso – HTC Slide

fascinatemtd – Samsung Fascinate

galaxys2att – Samsung Galaxy S2 ATT

galaxys2 – Samsung Galaxy S2

galaxysbmtd – Samsung GalaxyS_B

galaxysmtd – Samsung GalaxyS

glacier – T-Mobile myTouch 4G / HTC Glacier

hallon – SE XperiaNeo-MT15i

heroc – HTC Hero CDMA

hero – HTC Hero

inc – Droid Incredible

iyokan – SE XperiaPro-MK16i

jordan – Motorola Defy

legend – HTC Legend

liberty – HTC Aria

mango – SE XperiaMiniPro-SK17i

mesmerizemtd – Samsung Mesmerize

morrison – Motorola Cliq

motus – Motorola Backflip

olympus – Motorola Atrix

one – Geeksphone ONE

p920 – LG Optimus 3D

p925 – LG ATT Thrill

p970 – LG Optimus Black

p990 – LG Optimus 2X

p999 – T-Mobile G2x

passion – Google Nexus One

saga – HTC Desire S

satsuma – SE XperiaActive-ST17i

shadow – Motorola Droid X

sholes – Motorola Droid

showcasemtd – Samsung Showcase

smultron – SE XperiaMini-ST15i

speedy – HTC Evo Shift

supersonic – HTC Evo

tass – Samsung GalaxyMini

u8220 – Huawei U8220

urushi – SE XperiaRay-ST18i

v9 – ZTE V9

vega – Advent Vega

vibrantmtd – Samsung Vibrant

vision – T-Mobile G2 / HTC Desire Z

vivo – Droid Incredible S

vivow – Droid Incredible 2

zeppelin – Motorola CliqXT

zero – Geeksphone ZERO

zeusc – SE Xperia Play CDMA-R800x

zeus – SE Xperia Play -R800i

And that’s all, folks; Head on to http://get.cm/?type=RC , install, and have fun!

Aaa

Woho

via CyanogenMod-7.2.0-RC1 is upon us | CyanogenMod.

DARPA’s “Cheetahrobot sets new speed record of 18mph on treadmillBy John Timmer | Published about an hour agoBiologically inspired designs are not a new thing in robotics, but the video embedded below is the first time I’ve ever seen something that looks like it’s modeled on a family pet. Development of the Cheetah robot is being funded by DARPA, the US’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The folks at DARPA have been seing an increased military reliance on robots for disarming and disposing of explosives, so they’ve set about funding programs to improve the perforance of this hardware.Cheetah, built by Boston Dynamics, is an attempt to add some speed to robots with legs wheeled robots can already go pretty fast. It’s somewhat disorienting to watch, because it appears to be running backwards—the legs are flexed in the opposite direction from the one most animals travel, and a bit of hardware that looks like a head is actually in the rear. But one key development is actually in the robot’s body, which is able to flex as part of the stride. The end result is a top speed of about 18 miles an hour, nearly a third faster than the previous record for a robot on legs.There’s still a long way to go before we catch up to an actual cheetah, which can hit 70 miles an hour. A video of the robot is embedded below.

via DARPA’s “Cheetah” robot sets new speed record of 18mph on treadmill.

Browsing just got sweeter for those of you with a Nook tablet.

Dolphin Browser HD is the fastest, easiest and most fun mobile Web browser. It’s also the world’s first Gesture, Webzine and Add-on enabled mobile web browser on Android — All of this is now available on Barnes & Noble’s Nook.

Continue to browse your favourite sites, books, magazines and videos through Dolphin Browser on your Nook.

Download your free Dolphin Browser for Nook Colour and Nook Tablet here.

  • #1 Mobile Web Browser on Android Market Over 10 million downloads
  • #2 on CNETs 100 Android Apps for 2011
  • #1 PC Mags “The 40 Best Free Apps for 2011″
  • Dolphin Browser’s Gestures and sidebars make Web surfing fast, intuitive and fun while on the go. – USA Today
  • Its a great, simple browser that feels more at home on a touchscreen device than pretty much anything else you’ll try. – Lifehacker

Features:

  • Gesture – Let your inner artist out and create a personal Gesture (symbol) to access the mobile and desktop websites you use the most.
  • Webzine – Fast Web page loading, with no ads. Dolphin Webzine simplifies the way you read your favourite mobile content, from news to blogs and websites.
  • Speed Dial – Visit you favourite mobile and desktop websites on the go with one touch.
  • Tabbed browsing – No need to toggle between screens, tabbed browsing lets you open and switch between Web pages fast as lightning.
  • Sidebars – Make the best of mobile interface via Dolphin Sidebar.

via Dolphin Browser Comes to Barnes & Noble’s Nook | Dolphin Browser® Blog.

1oz Silver Legal Tender Coins – First Release – Darth Vader Coin Set

About the Design

New Zealand Mint is proud to launch one of cinema’s most enduring and beloved franchises, Star Wars, as a legal tender coin set. These coin series will be hugely popular for both Star Wars devotees and coin-collectors alike. This first series is a limited mintage and are quite simply out of this Universe. Don’t deny the Force within you, and get your set today.

Link:

http://www.newzealandmint.com/starwars/darth-vader-coin-set?nocache=1

via Star Wars coins – legal tender in New Zealand.

Google and Intel on Tuesday said that the two companies will work together to ensure that future versions of Google’s Android operating system function on Intel’s Atom processors.

The partnership will help Intel compete against ARM chips, which have been supported by Android since 2008. It also underscores the fact that the “Wintel” alliance between Microsoft and Intel isn’t what it used to be.

Top 20 Android Productivity Apps

Intel CEO Paul Otellini showed off a smart-phone running Android on a Medfield chip at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco on Tuesday, though details about the specific version of Android were not revealed.

He characterized the partnership as a step toward bringing Intel-powered phones to market.

Google SVP of mobile Andy Rubin showed up too, signalling the two companies’ continued commitment to a relationship that encompasses Intel’s involvement in Chrome OS, Google TV, and its effort to port Android 3.0 “Honeycomb” to the x86 chip architecture. Rubin said that all future versions of Android will be optimized for x86. Presumably this includes the next major Android release, known as Ice Cream Sandwich, which is expected before the end of the year.

Intel has had trouble convincing mobile device makers to use its x86-based chips because of their power consumption characteristics. Instead, many have preferred the ARM architecture.

Apple, for example, bought chip design company PA Semi in 2008 and has been deploying its own ARM-based A-series chips in its mobile devices. Intel is reportedly interested in manufacturing Apple’s chip designs, a testament to the direction in which the mobile market is moving.

Even Microsoft is moving to support ARM chips in Windows 8, in addition to x86 chips. The company provided details about its ARM support plans at its BUILD conference on Tuesday.

To compete more affectively against ARM designs, Intel is betting on its Medfield chip platform, which includes a low-power Atom design for mobile phones, and on chips arriving in 2012 based on a 22-nm manufacturing process.

Android To Run On Intel Chips – Hardware – Processors – Informationweek.

The computer world has a rich history of hackers who steered the progress of computer science and gave shape to computers, the internet and networking as we see it today — in some cases single-handedly.

And while yes, there are the Black Hat hackers behind internet mayhem, thievery, and chaos, there are also White Hat hackers who use their computer savvy for good. There’s also a different kind of hacker entirely: the tinkerer. They all played parts, big and small, in creating the computer world as it exists today. Here are 10 of the greatest:

Konrad Zuse

It all begins with Konrad Zuse, arguably the very first computer hacker. He may not have been a hacker in the modern sense of the word, but none of it would have been possible without him. You see, Zuse made the world’s very first fully programmable (Turing-complete as they say) computer, known as the Z3. It began, of course, as the Z1, and while it wasn’t built in a cave with a box of scraps, Zuse did build it himself in his parents’ apartment, completing it in 1938. Zuse eventually gained some backing by the German government, leading to the evolution from the Z1 to the Z3, which, complete in 1941, is considered the mother of modern computing.

John “Captain Crunch” Draper

John Draper was hacking computers long before computers were even common place. Draper’s hacking heyday was back in the early 1970s, when the largest computer network to which the general public had any access was the telephone system. At the time, telephones were managed by an automated system using specific analogue frequencies which could be exploited to make free long distance or even international calls. It was called “Phreaking”, and one of the most well-known Phreaking tools was a toy whistle that came in a box of Cap’n Crunch cereal. With this whistle, Draper created another popular Phreaking tool known as the Blue Box, a device that could produce many other tones used by the phone companies.

Steve Wozniak

A contemporary to John Draper, Wozniak was no stranger to Phreaking. In fact, after Draper shared the details of his Blue Box design during a Homebrew Computer Club meeting, Wozniak built a version of his own. Steve Jobs saw the marketing potential in the device, and the two Steves began their first joint venture together. Wozniak’s hacking days weren’t all spent on projects of questionable legality, though. With the proceeds from their blue boxes as well as selling Wozniak’s cherished HP calculator and Jobs’ VW van, Wozniak created the Apple I. With the other Steve’s marketing prowess, their company became the industry leader it is today.

Robert Tappan Morris

As a graduate student at Cornell University, Robert Morris created his claim to fame: the computer worm. According to Morris, he created the worm as an attempt to gauge the size of the internet at the time. After its release on November 2, 1988, the Morris Worm went on to infect approximately 6000 systems (about 10 per cent of the internet attached computers at the time). The worm was intended to be unobtrusive, but due to a flaw in its replication algorithm, it copied itself excessively, causing heaving system loads and ultimately leading back to Morris. In 1989, Morris became the first person indicted and later convicted under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986.

Mark “Phiber Optik” Abene

Here’s a name you may not be familiar with: Mark Abene. He never hacked into the D.O.D. nor did he steal millions of dollars in some Swordfish-style bank heist. What he did do was piss off AT&T. As a member of the hacker group Masters of Destruction, Abene was often poking around on AT&T’s systems. When AT&T’s telephone system crashed, leaving 60,000 customers without phone service for over nine hours, they quickly blamed Abene. The Secret Service paid him a rather aggressive visit, confiscating his equipment, and while AT&T eventually admitted that the crash was a mistake on its part, Abene was charged with computer tampering and computer trespassing in the first degree. Later, he would face more charges and ultimately serve a year in federal prison, making him the first hacker to do so.

Kevin “Dark Dante” Poulsen

Poulsen holds claim to one of the more amusing hacks of all time. A radio contest held by KIIS-FM promised a shiny new Porsche 944 S2 to the 102nd person to call into the station. Rather than try his luck among the multitude of Los Angeles listeners, Poulsen took over all of the telephone lines to the station to ensure he’d be the 102nd caller. He eventually had to disappear once he became a fugitive of the FBI. This landed him a spot on the popular TV show Unsolved Mysteries. The show’s hotlines crashed when the episode aired. Coincidence? In 1991, Poulsen was arrested and eventually pleaded guilty to various counts of computer fraud, money laundering, and obstruction of justice. Interestingly, since his incarceration, Poulsen made a complete 180, helping in cyber crime cases, and even capturing sexual predators on MySpace.

Kevin Mitnick

Kevin Mitnick is perhaps the most famous hacker in computer history, likely due to his being the first hacker to make the FBI’s Most Wanted list. As a master of social engineering, Mitnick didn’t just hack computers; he hacked the human mind. In 1979, at the age of 16, he hacked his way into his first computer system and copied proprietary software. He would often engage with admin personnel, such as in phone calls and email messages, and trick them into giving up passwords and other security information. After a two and a half year pursuit, Mitnick was finally arrested and served five years in prison. He now runs his own computer security consultancy, Mitnick Security Consulting.

Tsutomu Shimomura

Not all hackers fall under the Black-Hat umbrella. Tsutomu Shimomura is a White-Hat hacker credited with capturing Kevin Mitnick. In 1994, Mitnick stole some of Shimomura’s personal files and distributed them online. Motivated by revenge, Shimomura came up with a trace-dialling technique to back-hack his way in to locating Mitnick. With Shimomura’s information, the FBI was able to pinpoint and arrest Mitnick.

Richard Stallman

In his early years, Stallman was a graduate student and programmer at MIT’s Artificial Intelligence Labs where he would constantly engage with MIT’s rich hacking culture. As an advocate for just about everything Open Source, Stallman fought back when MIT installed a password system in its Computer Science department. He would decrypt users’ passwords (not an easy task given the processing power of the 1970s) and send them a message with their password in plaintext, suggesting they leave the password blank in order to re-enable anonymous use. Going into the 1980′s, Stallman didn’t like the proprietary stance many manufacturers were taking on their software. This eventually led Stallman to create the GNU General Public licence and GNU operating system, a completely free Unix-like OS that is completely Unix-compatible.

Linus Torvalds

Following Stallman’s lead, Linus Torvalds is another White-Hat hacker. His hacking days began with an old Commodore VIC-20 and eventually a Sinclair QL, both of which he modified considerably. On the QL in particular, he programmed his own Text Editor and even a Pac-Man clone he dubbed Cool Man. In 1991, he got an Intel 80386 powered PC and began creating Linux, first under its own limited licence but eventually merged it into the GNU Project under the GNU GPL. Torvalds hadn’t originally intended on continued support for his Linux Kernel, but due to the nature of the Open Source project, it grew into one of the most hacker friendly (and secure) operating systems available.

10 Hackers Who Made History | Infostruction.

Google+is the new social networking kid on the block, and one of the main reasons so many people are interested in the service over Facebook is Google+’s proclaimed focus on protecting users’ privacy. Whether you’re a new Google+ user or you’re already a pro, understanding how to control your information on the site can make you feel much more at ease on the social network. Here’s the low-down on Google+’s privacy controls, including a few of the more buried settings you’ll want to know about.

This guide will take you through setting up Google+’s circles with an emphasis on how they work from a privacy perspective, how to control what others can see about you on your profile, your options for selectively sharing posts with others, and some miscellaneous settings you’ll want to tweak — like only allowing friends to start Huddles with you. A note on pseudonymity: Google has taken a strong and, I think, awfully mistaken stance on not allowing people to use Google+ with a pseudonym. While this is definitely a privacy issue, it falls outside of this post’s purpose of explaining how to use Google+’s privacy settings. Kee Hinckley, a Consulting CTO for Somewhere.com and Lead Architect at Zinc.tv, has written a compelling and thorough poston the subject, and hopefully Google is listening and will rectify this issue.Let’s go tackle your main Google+ privacy settings and options:

Click the link to read on…

via A guide to controlling privacy, info on Google+ – Technology & science – Tech and gadgets – msnbc.com.